The California Prescription Drug Addiction Helpline is committed to helping those who struggle with prescription drug addiction find treatment. These resources will provide readers with articles and up to date reports on issues regarding drug addiction and treatment. Check back often for new and exciting material.

Easy access to Xanax leads to spike in prescription drug abuse among youngsters

Easy access to Xanax leads to spike in prescription drug abuse among youngsters

Parenting has never been tougher than in the last decade or so. With the rise in drug and alcohol use among youngsters, both in schools and colleges, it has become increasingly difficult to ensure that students don’t abuse drugs. With legal and administrative checks in place, the sale, possession and consumption of illegal drugs are under control to quite an extent. However, what about those prescription drugs or plain old remedial painkillers lying around in most homes? Continue reading

Things you should know about codeine

Things you should know about codeine

Megan’s 16-year-old daughter Nancy was behaving strange since last few days. After college, she would simply retire to her room and not engage in any family activity or conversations. One day when Nancy was out, Megan set out to search her daughter’s room. She saw at least 20 empty bottles of cough syrup in Nancy’s cupboard and she immediately understood the reason behind her daughter’s lethargy, loss of appetite and agitation. Continue reading

Depressive symptoms spike opioid use among OA patients

Depressive symptoms spike opioid use among OA patients

With over 54 million people (23 percent of adults) afflicted with arthritis, it has emerged as a leading cause of disability in the United States. The medical costs inflicted by this disease are about 81 billion. The term arthritis encompasses more than 100 diseases and conditions that affect the joints. Of these, osteoarthritis (OA) is the most prevalent form of arthritis, particularly among the middle-aged and older population. Continue reading

Hospitals overprescribing cosh to sedate dementia patients

Hospitals overprescribing cosh to sedate dementia patients

It has been difficult for Susan to constantly run to and fro from her high profile job in New York to the quaint backwaters where Jack Strafford lives with his old German Shepherd in the ancestral house. Ever since her 60-yr-old dad, whom she lovingly called “Grizzly” because of the unruly hair, lost his wife and partner of 40 years, he had increasingly become aloof. A sense of filial love brought Susan to her home after a long drive every weekend. But this time, she noticed that he looked different, was gruff and kept forgetting important things such as taking medications. His neighbors informed that he often stays on the front porch for long, staring at nowhere. Susan was alarmed. She got him medically tested. Then came the medical report – Strafford had been diagnosed with a neurodegenerative disorder – dementia. “It will only get worse,” suggested the doctors. “Better get him into a senior’s home. He needs constant attention.” Continue reading

Pain linked to nonmedical prescription opioid use in young adults

Pain linked to nonmedical prescription opioid use in young adults

Nonmedical prescription opioid (NMPO) use in America has witnessed a significant rise over the past decade. According to the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM), in 2015, there were 20,101 overdose deaths related to prescription pain relievers, while 12,990 people succumbed to heroin overdose in the country. Young adults who frequently used NMPOs were more likely to overdose. Continue reading

Maintaining database of opioid prescriptions helpful in preventing misuse, finds study

Maintaining database of opioid prescriptions helpful in preventing misuse, finds study

Researchers from the Cornell University have supposedly come up with a simple way of tackling the menace of opioid misuse in the United States. They suggest that if the doctors check the prescription history of their patients, it can help them assess their patient’s chances of misusing an opioid. They can accordingly prescribe further opioids. Since almost every state has prescription database, doctors and pharmacists can utilize it to detect any stains of dependence or addiction. Continue reading

Lack of recovery management services hampers long-term recovery from drug abuse

Lack of recovery management services hampers long-term recovery from drug abuse

The treatment for addiction does not end when a patient completes his or her stay in a specialized treatment facility. Instead, it is a lifelong effort to adhere to sobriety, knowing that a simple slip or mistake is often enough for a former abuser of substances to spiral back into his or her drug abusing lifestyle. Therefore, medical practitioners and experts nowadays pay increased attention upon the integration of recovery management practices in the overall treatment. Despite the fact that there are increased chances of a relapse, a study of the data related to the American patients suggests that less than 17 percent of them received medication approved by the Food and Drug Administration of the United States. Addiction treatment centers and related health care providers not only have the responsibility to reinstate the previous nondrug abusing state in the course of treatment in people with the problem of addiction, but they have to also empower them to appropriately deal with cravings and ensure control over their life. In addition, they also have the responsibility to impart coping mechanisms that allow a former user to identify triggers and cues that may seduce them toward drug abuse. That is the end goal, at least on paper. The above study led by Sarah Naeger, Ph.D., M.P.H., with the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) tried understanding the patterns of post-discharge prescription fills among patients following opioid-related hospitalization. Continue reading

Longer use of OTC pain relievers associated with hearing loss in women, finds study

Longer use of OTC pain relievers associated with hearing loss in women, finds study

Women who are quick to pop a pill with the slightest hint of pain need to be careful when they search their bedside table for the pack of painkillers the next time. According to a new study, titled “Duration of Analgesic Use and Risk of Hearing Loss in Women,” published in the American Journal of Epidemiology in January 2017, frequent use of over-the-counter (OTC) painkillers including aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) and acetaminophen may lead to hearing loss in women. Continue reading

Prescription painkillers after severe injury not responsible for opioid abuse, says study

Prescription painkillers after severe injury not responsible for opioid abuse, says study

The havoc created by opioid epidemic in the United States is attributed mostly to the addictive nature of the drugs. Numerous studies have explained the psychological impact of irresponsible use of pain relievers. Looking at the situation, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) formulated guidelines in 2016 that recommended physicians about the duration of the prescription they must advise to their patients.

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Myths about prescription painkillers

Myths about prescription painkillers

Prescription drugs are widely abused substances in the United States because they are legal. Often people take someone else’s medications or, at times their own, in a way not recommended by a doctor, mostly to get high. Sadly, many people using opioids are unable to weigh the risks and benefits of such an action and get misled due to false information surrounding pain medications. Surprisingly, many do not even have the correct understanding of when to take them or how they work, leading to irreversible harm and adverse reactions owing to misinformation. Continue reading